5,000 Nigerian Medical Doctors, Personnel Work In South Africa

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Medical doctors in South Africa
Medical doctors in South Africa

The brain drain syndrome has taken a toll on the country’s medical profession as more than 5,000 Nigerian medical practitioners are said to be working in various South African teaching, public and private hospitals.

Mr. Godwin Adama, the Consul General (CG) of Nigeria in South Africa, stated this in a statement through Mr. David Abraham, the Vice Consul, Information and Culture on Monday in Abuja.

Adama was quoted by Abraham that this news was broken to him when Nigerian Doctors’ Forum South Africa, led by Dr Emeka Ugwu, its Secretary General, visited him in Johannesburg.

“This shows that virtually every hospital in South Africa has a sizeable number of Nigerian Doctors; and this include teaching, public and private hospitals.

“What this means is that Nigerian Doctors and other professionals are constantly adding value to the system and this cannot be over-emphasised,’’ he said.

According to him, South Africa is replete with many Nigerian professionals who are contributing to the economic development in both public and private sectors in the country.

“Unfortunately, this has been either not reported at all or grossly under-reported.

“It is in this light that Nigerian professionals in South Africa have determined that they will no longer sit by and allow their numerous contributions undermined and eroded by negative publicity,” Adamu said.

He said that Nigerian doctors in South Africa had been involved in medical outreaches, where they rendered health services to the less privileged members of the society, particularly the Nigerian nationals.

Adama said that the Consulate would continue to celebrate Nigerian Medical Doctors and other professionals in South Africa.

He reiterated that the Consulate would continue to partner with all Nigerian Associations in South Africa to advance the wellbeing and welfare of Nigerians.

“We therefore, use this medium to call on all our nationals to emulate the professionals and continue to be law abiding,” he said.

The Secretary-General of the Forum earlier had informed the Consulate about their activities and the need to continue to render improved services in the South African health sector.

Ugwu expressed satisfaction with the current improved service delivery at the Consulate and urged the Consul General not to relent on his efforts.

According to him, the Forum is currently planning to expand this gesture, in partnership with the Nigerian Missions, to cover as many South Africans as possible to foster good neighbourliness between the two countries.

Ugwu said Prof. Olalekan Ayo-Yusuf, the President of the Forum, could not make it due to exigencies of duty.

“Ayo-Yusuf is currently the Deputy Vice Chancellor of Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, South Africa,” he said.